Book Review: A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder

Read Dates:

July 18-21, 2021

Star Rating:

4

TL;DR:

Everyone knows Sal Singh killed his girlfriend Andie Bell before he died by suicide. He even admitted to it in a final text message to his parents. For her senior project, Pip Fitz-Amobi decides to investigate and prove once and for all Sal is innocent.

Full Review:

4 stars for A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder for the sheer fact that I could not put this book down! Sometimes I give high ratings to a book because the prose itself is moving or the characters are lovable (or hate-able) or because the story transformed my worldview. And sometimes, I give a book a high rating simply because I just had so much freakin’ fun reading it! A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder is one such book.

The parallels between season 1 of the podcast Serial are prominent, and definitely not unintentional. That’s a bold and risky move but Holly Jackson executed it to perfection. You’ll also enjoy this one if you grew up reading Harriet the Spy because good-girl Pippa “Pip” Fitz-Amobi is determined to go to any investigative lengths necessary in order to prove that Sal Singh did not murder his beautiful, popular girlfriend, Andie Bell before killing himself. And along the way, Pip will of course typify the genre and strike up some not-so-subtle chemistry with Sal’s charming brother, Ravi, who inevitably partners with Pip to exonerate Sal.

I do have some critiques, but they’re altogether minor. Something about the third-person POV was off. I kept thinking it was first person, so whenever the narrator said “she” in reference to Pip, I was momentarily confused. I also noted more than a few British terms that slipped through the cracks during editing. Like I said, minor stuff. The end felt a little rushed and some of the events that took place toward the end were not very plausible, but it is a young adult mystery/thriller, so I’ll let that part slide.

I’ll definitely read the other 2 books in the series (the third book comes out later this year)!

Bottom line:

If you’re looking for a book that feels like a puzzle – this is it.

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